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Poultry Insights and Innovation from the
Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health USA Team

Poultry Insights and Innovation from the Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health USA Team

Select Laboratories was established in 1971 by Homer Wilson, Max Ward, and James Evans, active leaders of the state’s broiler industry. The original location was in Athens, Georgia established as a cooperative venture to produce Marek’s disease vaccines for integrators in the area. As the demand for the product increased, the facility was relocated to Gainesville, Georgia.

A successful decade included acquiring a USDA manufacturing license and the introduction of vaccination equipment. They were also the first company to supply Newcastle bronchitis vaccines in 5,000 dose vials and in four years increased to 25,000 dose packs for field administration for broiler flocks.

By the late ’80s the company had received 63 USDA licenses to manufacturer various vaccines.

In 1988, recognizing the prominent position of the company in the US market, Rhone Merieux of France acquired Select Laboratories, facilitating expansion of the research and production facilities. The decades of success resulted in Boehringer Ingelheim acquiring Merial in January of 2017.

Investing Over $120M In Georgia Operations

Investing Over $120M In Georgia Operations

Expansion increases vaccine R&D and manufacturing capabilities.

Expansion increases vaccine R&D and manufacturing capabilities.

Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health is supporting its US operations by creating hundreds of extra jobs and investing more than $120 million in its Georgia facilities.

The company's US headquarters are located in Duluth, where it has already created 75 new jobs. Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health USA is now adding over 100 new roles at its manufacturing and R&D facility in Athens, as well as around 50 jobs at its Gainesville manufacturing facility.

A Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health spokesperson told Animal Pharm around half of the amount represents new investments the company is making to expand and enhance its production and R&D capabilities.

This latest total features $80m of investment the company previously highlighted in 2017. This funding is aimed at increasing filling capacity for companion animal and poultry vaccines made in Athens, Georgia, and accommodating increased production of livestock vaccines in St. Joseph, Missouri.

Everett Hoekstra, the new president of Boehringer’s animal health operations in the US, said: “For nearly 40 years, the company and its predecessors have helped make the state of Georgia a key player in animal health – from its beginning producing rabies vaccines in Athens, to multiple facilities today, that are playing an instrumental role in advancing animal health and wellbeing.

“Our investments will expand our capabilities and presence in Georgia and drive future growth and innovation to help prevent disease in livestock and pets.”


Animal Pharm. "Boehringer Ingelheim to invest $120M in Georgia operations." February 14, 2019.
https://animalpharm.agribusinessintelligence.com/informa.cpm/ap015300/boehringer-to-invest-over-$120m-in-Georgia-operations

Optimize Bird Performance with an
Effective Water Program

Optimize Bird Performance with an Effective Water Program

SUSAN WATKINS

Emeritus Distinguished Professor
Center of Excellence for Poultry Science
University of Arkansas

SUSAN WATKINS

Emeritus Distinguished Professor
Center of Excellence for Poultry Science
University of Arkansas

Water is the number one input for producing meat and eggs. While genetic efficiencies continue to improve the costs of production, it also means modern strains of birds require optimal management to maximize performance. Combined with the industry trend to reduce antibiotic usage, the need for clean, sanitized water is more important than ever.

Poultry water systems are vulnerable to contamination because the water is slow moving, warmed during brooding, and has many areas that can harbor biofilm. The addition of additives such as nutraceuticals, organic acids, electrolytes, and vitamins along with naturally occurring mineral contaminants including iron, manganese or sulfur create the potential for water supplies to harbor pathogenic organisms. The first step to optimizing quality is controlling the biofilm which given the right circumstances can harbor almost any pathogen.

Established biofilms develop a thick, polysaccharide wall that protect the organisms from sanitizer levels acceptable for bird consumption and as biofilms mature, they release organisms into the water. Dr. Kabel Robbins reported that an evaluation of turkey farm water systems confirmed E. coli isolated from turkeys was the same strains as the ones isolated from the water supplies. (Robbins, TPF Turkey Committee meeting, Sept. 2018.) Others such as Wideman et al have shown that Staphylococcus aureus in water supplies can cause femoral head necrosis in broiler chickens.1 Ou et al. showed infectious laryngotracheitis vaccine (ILT) could attach to water line biofilm and remain viable for up to 21 days.2 Controlling biofilm is an on-going challenge. Maharjan et al. proved that sterile polyvinyl chloride (pvc) pipe can develop a biofilm within 3-5 days when exposed to warm, contaminated water, and that if pathogenic E. coli was introduced into the moving water, the E. coli became attached to the biofilm with a week.3 These cases along with dozens of additional poultry production water experiences support the belief that water systems need consistent management to reduce risks of health challenges.

Water programs should begin with a thorough assessment of existing supplies from source to the point of consumption by the birds. Identify any areas that increase risks such as open storage tanks or lines which have not been thoroughly cleaned and develop a strategy to control the risks. A mineral and pH analysis of the source and after any treatments is crucial for understanding and managing quality. Never assume treatments such as filtration or reverse osmosis are working correctly. Collect sterile samples from the source and from the system for a microbial analysis which should include total bacteria, yeast, and mold. When farms or barns experience health issues on a consistent basis, swabbing within regulators or ends of water lines and requesting a diagnostic profile can help identify if the water supply is part of the problem.

Based on swab results collected from inside water lines, implement a cleaning and sanitation program that will minimize contamination where the birds are drinking. There are many effective cleaning products available but the key is to use products at correct concentrations and leave for adequate time for optimal biofilm removal. Cleaning the whole system is essential for best results. This includes distribution lines, storage tanks as well as all the water lines within barns. If line cleaning has not been done previously, it is a good idea to add dye to the cleaner mix so that it is clear when it has been completely flushed from the system. Swabbing water lines pre and post-line cleaning can help confirm effectiveness and for most reliable results, swab two lines pre cleaning and two different lines post cleaning. The final step in water system cleaning should include flushing out the cleaner with water that contains a drinking level of sanitizer residual. This helps protect the system from redevelopment of the biofilm as the water system sits dormant prior to flock placement.

The final step in providing optimal water quality is to develop a consistent daily water sanitation program using products that effectively keep the microbial levels controlled without affecting water consumption. Chlorine continues to be a great sanitizer but its effectiveness is limited by age of the product and pH of the water. The longer sodium hypochlorite or calcium hypochlorite sources of chlorine are stored, the less effective they become as a sanitizer and adding more to achieve a target free chlorine residual may result in the water becoming bitter and less palatable to the birds. Fresh product used within 2-3 weeks is best. pH also plays a significant role in chlorine’s sanitizing power. A pH in the range of 4-7 converts chlorine to hypochlorous acid which is the strong sanitizer. A 2 ppm free chlorine residual at a pH of less than 7 can be as much as 80-300 times more effective than 2 ppm of free chlorine at a pH of 8 or more. It's important to note that chlorine and acid products used to lower pH CANNOT be mixed in the same container. These should be injected separately with mixing allowed between the additions of each product to prevent gassing off of chlorine. When barns tend to use water slowly, such as during brooding, sanitizers such as stabilized hydrogen peroxide may be a better choice to keep water systems protected because their residual remains effective for days, unlike chlorine which generally breaks down within a few hours.

Target providing a sanitizing residual at the bird level that keeps bacteria levels in the water minimized. If products such as probiotics or vaccines are used, pulse them in for a limited time each day and then before the end of the day, make sure the birds are back on clean, sanitized water. Leaving water systems without sanitizers overnight or for multiple days invites microbial blooms.

Maintaining clean, sanitized water systems are an essential component for optimally raising modern poultry. With a little time and effort, water systems can be evaluated and a water program developed which will support production goals.


1. Al- Rubaye, Adnan A., Ojha, Sohita, K. Estill, R.F. Wideman and Douglas .D. Rhoads, 2014. Genetic and Genome Analyses of Bacteria Cultured from Lame Broilers with Osteomyelitis, PSA.

2. Ou, S. J.J. Giambrone and K.S. Macklin. 2011. Infectious laryngothacheitis vaccine virus detection in water lines and effectiveness of sanitizers for inactivating the virus. J, Appl. Poult Res. 20:223-230.

3. Maharjan, P., S. Dey. G. Huff, W. Zhang, G. Kumar-Phillips and S. Watkins, Effect of chlorine.

Women in Poultry

Women in Poultry


CLAUDIA OSORIO
DVM, MSpVM, Diplomate ACPV

Professional Veterinarian Services
US Poultry Business Unit
Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health

CLAUDIA OSORIO
DVM, MSpVM, Diplomate ACPV

Professional Veterinarian Services
US Poultry Business Unit
Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health

The veterinary medicine profession has changed over the last 100 years. One of the major changes is the number of women involved in the field.

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), in a traditionally male-dominated industry, as of the year 2009, the number of female veterinarians in the field officially surpassed males.1

In the 2017 class, the total enrollment at US veterinary medical schools, more than 80% of the students were women.2 This extraordinary change in the profession is growing. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, the current ratio is 55 percent female/45 percent male in the veterinary market (private and public).2

Every day more organizations empower women to be leaders in their fields.

One of the organizations that is supporting women in the agricultural field is the Women in Agribusiness. The Women in Agribusiness organizes a summit every year that was created out of a recognized and confirmed industry need for a forum to address the challenges and opportunities for women in the agribusiness and food sector. The meeting brings together a powerful group of women leaders in the global agribusiness and food production industries to facilitate networking, professional development, and mentoring in a fresh and innovative format.

Boehringer Ingelheim’s Poultry Business Unit has been sponsoring our female poultry veterinarian membership. It also sponsors other women in the poultry industry to participate in the summit and become members of the association to encourage leadership and support for other women in the professional poultry sector.

Another very important new organization, which Boehringer Ingelheim’s Poultry Business Unit is supporting and sponsoring, is the American Association of Avian Pathologist (AAAP) Women’s Network. The AAAP Women’s Network (AWN) is passionate about ensuring a welcoming organization to all while providing support to the increasing number of women who are entering the poultry industry. The steering committee and its members have said: "we believe that great leaders learn from the past, embrace the present and look to the future with resilience and optimism." Thus, while this committee is focused on leadership and development opportunities for women in AAAP, their overarching goal is to be supported by and work collaboratively with the male counterparts within the organization.

Currently the AWN has over 90 members from different sectors within the poultry industry. Members are from academia, allied industries, poultry medicine, production, veterinary students, and veterinarians specializing in poultry services.

One of our BI Animal Health Poultry team veterinarians is a member of the steering committee.

The mission of the AWN is to encourage women to embrace opportunities for leadership and personal growth within this profession and their personal lives. Also, it seeks to motivate women to actively achieve leadership, policy and decision-making positions within AAAP and the poultry industry.

Finally, the World Veterinary Day is an opportunity to acknowledge and recognize the contributions of those that dedicate their lives to animal health and wellbeing as well as society.


1. American Veterinary Medical Association, "Market Research Statistics: U.S. Veterinarians 2009." https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Statistics/Pages/Market-research-statistics-US-veterinarians-2009.aspx

2. Veterinarian's Money Digest, "Veterinary Medicine Is a Woman's World" May 7, 2017 https://www.vmdtoday.com/news/veterinary-medicine-is-a-womans-world

Solving the Puzzle of Poultry Farm Financing

Solving the Puzzle of Poultry Farm Financing


BECKY ADAMS

Agri Loan Officer
First Financial Bank

BECKY ADAMS

Agri Loan Officer
First Financial Bank

Everyone always asks me what they need in order to borrow money. They also ask if they can make money and most of the time the answer is “It depends.”

Before deciding to purchase or expand, borrowers should consider what they currently have, what they want the money for, and what their plan is for the future.

A particular goal or need has brought them to the borrowing arena: they have a dream, or are looking to make a career change, or they want to build something for the future. At that point, we can begin to solve the financial puzzle, determining together what they can afford. And if they can’t afford it now, we’ll discuss what they need to do in order to afford it in the future. A lender will ask many questions.

Some of these questions are:

  • What is the purchase price or how much will the expansion cost?
  • How many acres is it?
  • Where is it located?
  • How many poultry houses are you building or buying?
  • What are the dimensions?
  • Are any upgrades needed?
  • Do you have building quotes?
  • Will you have a down payment?
  • Have you spoken to an integrator?
  • Will you be selling your home?
  • Do you have farming experience?

Every loan has two main parts.

Determining the cash flow and the collateral for the loan. Anyone borrowing money needs to know whether or not they can expect to make money. If it will not make money, then they need to demonstrate they can make the payments on the loan.

What is the value of all collateral being pledged?

The loan to appraised value will be determined from the loan amount divided by the collateral pledged. Collateral can be what is being purchased or it can be another property being pledged. A down payment will lower the amount of the loan needed.

Looking at the “big picture”, financially speaking, what assets does the borrower have?

What liabilities do they have? These answers will aid in filling out a financial statement that will give us their net worth. The financial statement sometimes is also called a balance sheet. This is a financial snapshot of what you have and what you owe on any given day.

Once we have answered these questions we can begin to run cash flows on the purchase or expansion.

The combination of the loan amount and cash flow projections will determine the net income available after payments and expenses. This will be the expected salary earned from the operation. These two items will help determine if the new venture has the potential to be successful. There will still be more information needed, but this will put you on the right path for success. Most experienced lenders should be able to provide you an idea of how they would structure the loan based on what you are looking to achieve and an estimated cash flow based on your proposed expansion or farm purchase.

When was Boehringer Ingelheim founded and by whom?

When was Boehringer Ingelheim founded and by whom?

The pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim was founded in 1885 by Albert Boehringer in Ingelheim am Rhein, Germany. From its beginnings in 1885 when it employed just 28 people in Nieder-Ingelheim, the company has since become a global enterprise.

 

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We hoped you have enjoyed this edition of The Feed and welcome your comments and content suggestions. If you are interested in providing content to be published in our newsletter, please let us know.

Click Here

For more information on Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health Poultry products and services, click here.